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Concrete example: How a single customer could impact a BIG company’s policy?

Concrete example: How a single customer could impact a BIG company’s policy?

By on Jul 4, 2020 in Amazon, customer driven change, customer service, economy, experiment, News, outofthebox, strategy |

Este articulo esta disponible es Español en Ejemplo concreto: como un cliente sencillo puede impactar la politica de una empresa grande?

The practical part of this article can be found on How to contact Amazon Spain?

This article is a tiny live experiment/demonstration, results are unknown at the time of publishing, only time will tell ^^

Why this experiment?

Having been a long-term amazon customer in many countries, I found my experience to be very different depending which amazon website I was using. Contacting amazon.co.uk, amazon.fr, amazon.de to solve an issue has always been a fast, pleasant and easy experience.

While the same experience on amazon.es is a disaster… I have not been able to get in touch with a human being. It seems Amazon.es used to have telephone numbers in the past (+34 900 803 711 and +34 800 810 251), as well as an option to get called. Now these options are gone (google says it works, but the number is an answering machine that says “welcome to amazon, we don’t use this number anymore”.)

I’m quite sure Mr Bezos said something like “If there’s one thing Amazon.com is about it’s obsessive attention to the customer experience, end-to-end”. (source https://www.inc.com/justin-bariso/20-years-ago-jeff-bezos-gave-an-interview-detailing-amazons-killer-strategy-and-its-absolutely-brilliant.html ) I thought this would apply to Amazon.es too… What could I do?

Think Amazon; think Google!
Play their game: Aim for the stars, use the data available and play an indirect move based on what customers are looking for.

The strategy:


Trying to figure a something that Amazon.es does not expect and forces them to move… in this case, their support is incredibly bad, … Maybe I can do something better (for the customer ^^)

So I googled to find a few emails of amazon.es employees, tailored a page to achieve decent ranking in “Contact amazon Spain”, on this page, I should have the most relevant content: a list of emails to real people working at amazon.es

If enough people find my page relevant to contact amazon.es, then Amazon.es might want to be more relevant than me on the “contact amazon Spain” by reinstating a decent customer support. If amazon.es does so, then this experience will prove to be a success, if not, then at least it will be useful for people wanting to contact a human being at amazon.es \o/

Conclusion:

In both cases, it took me less time to solve the root of the issue in a creative way (or to provide a better support channel than they do) – than to solve my individual issue: still waiting… talk about productivity!

Happy customer = Happy Amazon

Amazon Smile – CHENGETA WILDLIFE

Philosophical debate

Isn’t it ironic to use a company’s own weapon “against” itself?
I mean, Amazon spends incredible resources to trace internet users all around the world and knows more about us than we do ourselves.
Then they share these insights with “third parties”…

For once, a user did the opposite… he regrouped a tiny bit of publicly available data about amazon (nothing confidential of course), and shared it  with’s it’s third parties, aka the world.  An email address exists to receive mail right? Here you are \o/

How does Amazon feel about it? Interesting debate!